P0703
 
P0703
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P0703a
 
Personal Data
Surname Borthwick
First name William
Nickname  
Dating 1440?
Location Borthwick
Life dates born after 1411 – died c. 1458
Title  
Close relatives father - Sir William Borthwick, 2nd of Borthwick, castellan of Edinburgh (Sir William Borthwick of that Ilk)
mother - Bethoc (or Beatrice) Sinclair of Orkney, daughter of Henry Sinclair, 1st Earl of Orkney
wife (1) - Unknown
wife (2) - Mariotta Hoppringle
children (1)
James Borthwick, d. before 1494
Sir Thomas Borthwick, d. after 1503
Alexander Borthwick, d. after 1513
wife (3) - Unknown
children (3)
Sir William Borthwick, 2nd Lord Borthwick, died between 1483 and 1484
John Borthwick, 1st of Crookston, died c. 1459
Margaret Borthwick, m. Sir John Maxwell of Calderwood
Type of the object tomb effigy
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition Church, Borthwick, Midlothian, Scotland
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
Comments

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Unknown Borthwick
1450
Church, Borthwick, Midlothian, Scotland

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Borthwick Church was rebuilt after a fire for the 2nd time in the 1700s. It was originally built at the same time as the Borthwick Castle in the 1450s.
The effigies are said to be those of the first Lord and Lady Borthwick and date from the 1400s. You can still see some colour on the sword.

Hello, recently I've been looking into scottish effigies and wanted to gather people's opinion on the dating of one in particular, the effigy of Borthwick parish church. Often said to be that of "Lord Borthwick", no date is featured on the effigy itself and can only be guessed by the date of death of the supposed lord of Borthwick but more accuratly by its features. The lack of tasset make me think it's quite early but archaism might be a possibility. Dr Capwell dates similar effigies from Aberdeen to 1440-65.

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Borthwick / Lochorworth / Locharquhart (Loquhariot) Parish Church
A twelfth-century apse and fifteenth century south aisle survive from the medieval church; the rest is of 1862-4. There are fine effigies of Lord and Lady Borthwick.

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Engraving of the interior of Borthwick Church, with an effigy of a man in armour in an arched niche, showing a coat of arms. Titled "Monument in Borthwick Church". Drawn by Edward Blore. Published by Rodwell & Martin, New Bond Street, 2 April 1819. Engraved. by George Cooke. The effigy is said to be that of the first Lord Borthwick and dates from the 1400s.'
circa 1819

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Sir William Borthwick, 3rd of Borthwick and later 1st Lord Borthwick (born after 1411 – died c. 1458) was a Scottish peer and ambassador.
He built Borthwick Castle in 1430.
Since the date of the first Lord Borthwick’s death is unknown
He is said to be buried with his wife in Borthwick Kirk.

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An imposing fortress, Borthwick Castle was built in 1430 for Sir William Borthwick from whom the castle took its name. Sir William was born in 1411 but the date of his death is less certain.
We are fortunate that Sir William's tomb survives in the adjoining Borthwick Church. His effigy is lovingly placed beside that of his wife but, as he was married three times, we cannot be certain which one! Only the name of his second wife, Mariotta Hoppringle, is known but the tomb most likely pays tribute to his third wife who was mother to his heir.
Armour of the quality depicted on Sir William's body would have been imported from Italy and would have cost as much a Ferrari sports car would today. Traces of blue, green, black and gold paint indicate that the effigies were once brightly coloured and gilded. They no longer occupy their original position in the wall of the church due to a fire in 1780 and the subsequent rebuilding work that was carried out as a result.
There has been debate as to whether the tomb belongs to Sir William or his son but the style of armour is early which suggests the former is the more likely.

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Borthwick Castle: effigies in Borthwick Parish Church, of Sir William Borthwick and Beatrice Sinclair

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Borthwick is a hamlet, parish and stream in Midlothian, Scotland. The parish includes the 15th century Borthwick Castle, which is to the east of the village and the villages of Gorebridge and North Middleton. Nearby is Newtongrange in the parish of Newbattle.

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P0703b
 
Personal Data
Surname Seton
First name John
Nickname  
Dating 1434?
Location Port Seton
Life dates abt. 1370 - 1441
1373-1430
Title  
Close relatives father - William (Wyntoun) de Seton Baron Lord of Seton (abt. 1348 - abt. 1409)
mother - Janet (Fleming)
wife - Catherine (Sinclair) Seton
children
Marion (Seton) Baillie,
William Seton,
Christian (Seton) Leslie
Janet (Seton) Keith
Type of the object tomb effigy
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition Seton Collegiate Church, Port Seton, East Lothian, Scotland
Date of manufacturing 1434
Artist
Comments

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Sir John Seton
1434
Seton Collegiate Church, Port Seton, East Lothian, Scotland
Source - Brydall, Robert. 1895. The monumental effigies of Scotland, p. 409. Glasgow: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

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15th-century effigy of a knight
In 1434 Lady Catherine Seton built a side-chapel to house the tomb of her late husband, Lord John Seton.

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Seton Collegiate Church
The Presbytery also contains two effigies - an unknown Knight and his lady.
"We do not know which of the Seton family built the tomb nor the identity of the effigies. They may not even belong to the recess but could have been brought from the chantry chapel, demolished in thr early 1500s." Historic Scotland Official Visitors Guide.
"It is possible they represent Sir John Seton and Lady Katherine." Historic Scotland Official Visitors Guide.

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Cockenzie and Port Seton is a unified town in East Lothian, Scotland. It is on the coast of the Firth of Forth, four miles east of Musselburgh. The burgh of Cockenzie was created in 1591 by James VI of Scotland. Port Seton harbour was built by George Seton, 11th Lord Seton between 1655 and 1665.

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When Sir John Seton died in 1434, his widow, Lady Katherine, had a family chapel added to the nave, where the tomb was placed as well as an altar.

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John (Seton) Laird of Seton (abt. 1370 - 1441)
He must have died prior to 1434 as the estates of Seton were in ward in 1434. Maitland, while also getting the date wrong, says he was buried in Seton Church "in the yle foundit be his moder". This is incorrect, as the "yle" was built by his wife, and for him after his death.

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John SETON (1373-1430)

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P0703c
 
Personal Data
Surname Menzies (of Pitfoddels)
First name Gilbert
Nickname  
Dating 1433?
Location Aberdeen
Life dates +1459
+1433
Title Sir, Provost
Close relatives wife - Marjory Liddel
children
Alexander Menzies
David Menzie
Type of the object tomb effigy
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition St Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
Comments

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Sir Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels
1450
Maryculter Church, Maryculter, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Source - Brydall, Robert. 1895. The monumental effigies of Scotland, p. 399. Glasgow: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

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Effigies of Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels, and his wife, Marjory Liddel, in Maryculter Church
The remote and solitary churchyard of Maryculter possessed, till recent years, the effigies of Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels and his wife, Marjory Liddel, who lived in the fifteenth century (figs. 54 and 55). The broken fragments of the arch wherein they were originally placed are now a mass of rubbish, the figures having been removed to the church of St Nicholas in Aberdeen, where they lie on the sills of adjacent windows.

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Effigy of Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels in Maryculter Church

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St Nicholas, Aberdeen : Sir Alexander & Lady Elizabeth Irvine
St Nicholas, Union Street, Aberdeen.
Sir Alexander Irvine (d1457) & his wife Elizabeth.

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Dedicated to: Elizabeth de Keith
Inscription: Here also lies a noble lady, dame Elizabeth de Keith, daughter of Sir Robert de Keith, Knight Marischal of Scotland, and wife of the above Sir Alexander de Irvyn, who died the ...Day of ...in the year of our Lord 14...
Date: C15th
Material: Stone
Location: Drum's Aisle, St Nicholas Church, Union Street, Aberdeen, AB10 1JL

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A pair of stone effigies, now lying on the window sill of the West Church, Aberdeen, represent the couple. When the church became ruinous in 1730, the effigies were removed for safety to the churchyard of Maryculter, where they lay till quite recently.
1890

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The brass plate identifies the man as the ‘honourable and famous knight’ Alexander de Irvyn ‘Secundus’, the lord of Drum, Auchindoir, and Forglen. The woman is his wife Elizabeth Keith, daughter of Sir Robert Keith, Marischal of Scotland.
Whatever the truth, we know that at least one Alexander Irvine of Drum married Elizabeth Keith around 1411, ostensibly to staunch the feud between their two families. This Alexander was probably the same laird of Drum who served on an embassy to England in 1423 and was knighted at James I’s coronation in 1424. In 1439, he was appointed to the singular office of captain and governor of Aberdeen. He had been granted the lands of Forglen in 1414 and it held it from Arbroath Abbey on condition that he would lead the Abbey’s vassals into battle when necessary, as well as performing other duties. He was later granted Auchindoir in 1440, and then Learney by James II in 1446- though Learney does not appear on the brass plate in St Nicholas. He was succeeded by his son in July 1457, so presumably died before then, and his wife Elizabeth is supposed to have died c.1459.
*** He was later granted Auchindoir in 1440, and then Learney by James II in 1446- though Learney does not appear on the brass plate - the date of the tomb should be between 1440 and 1446

присутствует путаница между похожими памятниками, находящимися в Aberdeen и Maryculter
сейчас в Aberdeen присутствуют одиночный мужской и парный памятники
здесь - https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_029/29_329_410.pdf
одиночный памятник приписывается Sir Alexander de Irvyn и его жене Elizabeth de Keith (которой нет ни на современных фотографиях, ни на рисунке в книге, но чья фигура в книге упоминается как рядом лежащая)
сегодня этот памятник также приписывается Sir Alexander de Irvyn, погибшему в 1411 году (чему совершенно не соответствует изображенный доспех)
парный памятник приписывается Sir Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels и его жене Marjory Liddel. Этот памятник идентичен парному на современных фотографиях и сегодня приписываемому Sir Alexander de Irvyn II (на основании медной таблички рядом с памятником и большой путаницей в объяснении, что это за Alexander de Irvyn - брат? другого Alexander de Irvyn (одиночный памятник), сын?)
этот парный памятник в книге описывается как находившийся в Maryculter Church, но позже перемещенный в St Nicholas, Aberdeen (they lie on the sills of adjacent windows)
но здесь - https://electricscotland.com/history/deeside/historyofparish.pdf - говорится, что этот парный памятник (now lying on the window sill) был перемещен to the churchyard of Maryculter в 1730 из Aberdeen для сохранения, когда церковь стала разрушаться
Мною будет использоваться атрибуция книги - одиночный - Alexander de Irvyn; и парный - Gilbert Menzies и Marjory Liddel

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Gilbert Menzies, of Pitfodels
Дата рождения: предположительно между 1342 и 1458
Смерть: 1459
Место погребения: Aberdeen, Scotland
Муж Marjory Liddell
Отец Alexander Menzies, of Pitfodels и David Menzies, of Pitfodels
Chieftan Gilbert Menzies, who held the loch and lands of "Kandars," lying at "Colblain," ancestor of the Menzies' of Pitfodels. He fought at the battle of Harlaw, and was afterwards made Lord Provost of Aberdeen, which the records show he held from 1425 to 1439. He also sat in the Scottish Parliaments held by James II. at Edinburgh, 24th January 1449, and also at Stirling on the 4th April 1449; in both he represented the city of Aberdeen.

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... Sir Alexander Irvine of Drum at St Nicholas's in Aberdeen is similar to Provost Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels, also in Aberdeen.

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1843. Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, Том 1
Table of Contents. III. A View of the Diocese of Aberdeen. (MDCCXXXII (прим.-1732))
... some other old tombs ... that of Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels, provest of Aberdeen, quho dued A.D. M.CCCC.XXXIII. as the inscription of his image, and that of his wife, Marjory Liddel, here shews ...
!!! в книге от 1843 приводится перепечатка книги от 1732 с датой смерти 1433 (соответствует изображенному доспеху), указанной на памятнике

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In 1452 he founded and endowed the chantry or altar of S. Sebastian within the parish church of S. Nicholas. |
Gilbert Menzies was dead by 1463, as he is described as " quondam " in a charter dated in that year, and his monument was said to be in existence within the West Church about the beginning of this century, although no trace of it can now be discovered.

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