P0687
 
P0687
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Personal Data
Surname Knightly
First name John
Nickname  
Dating 1413
Location Gnosall
Life dates 1339 - +1413
Title lord of the manors of Knightly and Cowley in the parish of Gnosall
Close relatives father - Son of Robert de Knightley
mother - Juliane
wife - Elizabeth de Burgh
children
Richard de Knightley
Edmund Knightley
Robert Knightley
Juliane Knightley
Alice Knightley
Type of the object tomb effigy
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition St Laurence's, Gnosall, Staffordshire, Great Britain
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
comes from the workshops of Thomas Prentyce and Robert Sutton at Chellaston
Comments

(Link)
Legend has it that the last wolf in Staffordshire was killed here in Gnosall in a pit near Brough Hall and that the effigy in the Lady Chapel is that of its slayer, Baron Brough As much as I wish it were true, there is no evidence for this tale and no reason to believe the Baron ever even existed outside of Gnosall mythology. Several other names have been linked with the alabaster knight over the years, but his true identity remains unknown. Whilst such personal details are lacking, there is physical detail here in abundance, from the broken angel and the helmet at his head, to the lion at his now missing feet and experts have used these features to date the monument to the early fifteenth century. In recent years, the knight has been joined by the church's only other effigy, taken from the recess on the opposite side of the church known as the Easter Sepulchre.

(Link)
St Laurence's at Gnosall is a very impressive building which appears at first sight to be mostly 15th century, but has much earlier origins with significant parts of the 12th century Norman church remaining, more apparent from inside, with some fine early Norman arches at the crossing supporting the tower, and carved Romanesque capitals in the adjoining south transept.
Also in the south chapel are two ill-matched medieval effigies placed together on a single plinth. One is an alabaster knight of c1470, whilst alongside is a badly defaced child's figure at least a century earlier. Clearly they do not belong to the same monument, but together they comprise a very odd (and barely legal) couple!

(Link)
The alabaster effigy of a knight, on the south wall of the Lady Chapel, comes from the workshops of Thomas Prentyce and Robert Sutton at Chellaston. There are two theories about whom it represents. One possibility is that it is an effigy of Sir William Banestre who was knighted by Edward III at the siege of Calais in 1347; it is believed that he was buried at Gnosall. The other theory is that it represents Sir John Knightly, lord of the manors of Knightly and Cowley in the parish of Gnosall, who died in 1413. The pamphlet available in the church states that the style of the carving fits with this later date. The nearby effigy of a child is from the period 1380 to 1420

(Link)
Effigy in Gnosall Church,' showing an effigy with his feet and hands missing. [The figure represents Sir John Knightley of Brough Hall in Gnosall parish.]'J. B.,' [John Buckler.]

CHURCH MONUMENTS VOLUME XVII 2002
Mark Downing and Richard Knowles: A Fifteenth Century Helmet Depiction at Gnosall, Staffordshire.
It is perhaps surprising to discover an apparently unpublished but significant feature on a medieval monument. Here at Gnosall is just such an example.

Alabaster Effigy, Lady Chapel
GNOSALL
It was a pleasant surprise to find a church with a central tower in a small village. We arrived on a Saturday morning and received a warm welcome from those preparing the church for services on Sunday.
This was the site of a Saxon minster. These had the role in ministering to a wide community and had several priests. The original Saxon church is believed to be have been covered by Norman work in the 12th century. The crossing tower is supported on splendid Norman arches with massive stone supports at the four corners. Norman work remains also in the south transept and the west wall of the nave.
In the 13th century, aisles were added to the nave, with three wide bays. Access from the south aisle to the south transept was created through an arch. This involved removal of three of the four seats for the priests. The survivor is shown in my photograph.
The south wall of the nave, the east chancel, and the north transept date from the middle of the 13th century. The east window is from the 14th century. The top stage of the tower is from the 15th or 16th century. The lady chapel, lying south of the chancel was built originally in the 13th century but extended in the late 15th or early 16th century to make it the same length as the chancel itself. It is connected to the south transept through an arch. The south porch, visible in the picture, is a Victorian addition.
The organ now takes up most of the north transept. On the east side of the north transept there was a small chapel, which was the chantry chapel of St. Catherine, once used as a vestry. The church has a splendid new vestry built out to the north west, which was dedicated in 1994. The chest in the south transept may date from the 13th century.
The alabaster effigy of a knight, on the south wall of the Lady Chapel, comes from the workshops of Thomas Prentyce and Robert Sutton at Chellaston. There are two theories about whom it represents. One possibility is that it is an effigy of Sir William Banestre who was knighted by Edward III at the siege of Calais in 1347; it is believed that he was buried at Gnosall. The other theory is that it represents Sir John Knightly, lord of the manors of Knightly and Cowley in the parish of Gnosall, who died in 1413. The pamphlet available in the church states that the style of the carving fits with this later date. The nearby effigy of a child is from the period 1380 to 1420. The church has other features of interest including a holy water stoup, a piscina near the altar, Easter Sepulchre niche in the sanctuary, and relics of the pre-Reformation Rood Screen.
There has been a clock in the tower since the 17th century. The present clock was installed in 1775 but since 2000 it has been wound automatically by electric motors.

Gnosall Church - Effigy: wash drawing
Date: 1842
Description: 'Effigy in Gnosall Church,' showing an effigy with his feet and hands missing. [The figure represents Sir John Knightley of Brough Hall in Gnosall parish.]'J. B.,' [John Buckler.]

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