P0622
 
P0622
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P0622a
 
Personal Data
Surname McNair
First Name Neil
Nickname  
Dating 1345?
Location Saddell
Life dates  
Title  
Close relatives son - Donald
Type of the object  
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition Saddell Abbey, Saddell, Argyll and Bute, Strathclyde, Scotland
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
Comments

(Link)
the four largest effigies were probably made on Iona

(Link)
SADDELL ABBEY
The other three are magnificent West Highland lords in full armour. One of these is depicted with a retainer unfastening his spurs and a figure over his left shoulder which may indicated that his wife was buried alongside him. The central figure commemorates a giant of a man, whose armour remains remarkably detailed after all these centuries. Less obvious today is the inscription above his right shoulder which suggests the effigy commemorates one Neil McNair and was commissioned by his son Donald.
It is thought that the slabs on show, and one of the effigies, belong to what is called the "Kintyre School" of medieval carving, and it seems highly likely that this school, which produced grave slabs found the length of Kintyre and Knapdale, was located here at Saddell Abbey. It seems equally clear, however, that the four largest effigies were carved on Iona, and the similarities with some of those on display in the Iona Infirmary Museum are undisputable.

(Link)
This drawing shows one of a number of monuments from Saddell Abbey. The Hutton Collection includes further drawings detailing the famous grave slabs and other monuments found at Saddell. Saddell Abbey is famous for its impressive sculpted stones commemorating the wealthy and powerful lords who were its patrons. For years, people thought of these large stones as coming from Iona and shipped over to Saddell. This has changed, and a carving school probably existed at Saddell Abbey itself.

Monument at Sadael Abbey
A note beneath this pencil sketch of a warrior monument reads, 'Length 6 1/2 feet / Breadth 2'. Another note along the bottom explains that the slab lay to the east of church, outside its boundaries and near the grave of Dugald Campbell. Unusually for the stones at Saddell, the carved relief of a fully clad warrior dominates this one.

датировка выбрана 1345?, чтобы разместить данный костюм между P0610, 1340? и P0588, 1350?

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P0622b
 
Personal Data
Surname MacLeod VII ( of Lewis)
First name Roderick
Nickname  
Dating 1350?
Location Aiginish
Life dates +1498
Title 7th Chief of the MacLeods of Lewis
Close relatives  
Type of the object Grave slab
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition St Columba’s Church (Eaglais na h-Aoidhe), Aiginish, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Date of manufacturing from the 14th century
Artist
Comments

(Link)
St Columba’s Church, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Grave slab for Roderick MacLeod VII (Died 1498)
This is the grave slab of Roderick MacLeod VII. I think the VII means he was the seventh MacLeod chieftain of Lewis rather than that he was the seventh Roderick. He would have had nominal allegiance to the Lord of the Isles in Islay until 1493 when John MacDonald forfeited his land and titles to James IV of Scotland. Roderick would have sworn allegiance to James IV in 1493 though Lewis remained effectively independent

Effigies at Iona of Scots Isles Warriors or Galloglaich
Effigy at Iona of Roderick, 7th Chief of the MacLeods of Lewis (d. c.1498)
Effigy carved in hornblende schist, one depicts a knight with pointed helmet, said to be Roderick, 7th Chief of the MacLeods of Lewis (d. c.1498)
St Columba's Church, Aiginish, Lewis. Scotland

Eaglais Na H-Aoidhe, known in English as the Church of the Ui or Eye is in Aignish Cemetery in Point. Dating from the 14th century, this effigy above of a knight is thought to be Roderick, a chief of the Macleod’s.

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St Columba’s Church UI
(Eaglais na h-Aoidhe) is one of the most important archaeological sites on the Isle of Lewis. It was the main church during the medieval period and it is a burial place for the Macleod chiefs and the Mackenzies who controlled the island in later years. It contains two carved grave slabs commemorating Roderick Macleod VII (d.1498) and Margaret Mackinnon (d.1503).

(Link)
Aignish (Scottish Gaelic: Aiginis) is located northwest of Knock and east of Stornoway on the east coast of the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. The township is at the island side of the isthmus connecting to the Eye peninsula. Aignish is within the parish of Stornoway, and is situated on the A866 between Stornoway and Portnaguran
The crofting village contains the historic Ui Church (Scottish Gaelic: Eaglais na h-Aoidhe), a large pre-Reformation Church. The present church buildings are believed to be medieval, built during two separate construction phases. They were constructed on the site believed to be the cell of St Catan, a contemporary of St Columba. The church was the burial ground of the MacLeods of Lewis.

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