P0280
 
P0280
Главная / Personalia
 
P0280a
 
Personal Data
Surname Bagot
First name William
Nickname  
Dating 1407
Location Baginton
Life dates  
Title  
Close relatives father - Ralph Bagot
wife - Margaret
Type of the object brass
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition St. John the Baptist, Baginton, Warwickshire, UK
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
Comments

Sir William Bagot, 1407,
Baginton, Warwickshire

(Link)
Brass to William Bagot (1407), and his wife Margaret. The figures in this monument are 4ft 9.5 inches high.
William Bagot was the younger son of Ralph Bagot of Bagot's Bromley in Staffordshire. Both William and his elder brother John were part of John of Gaunt's 1386 expedition to claim the throne of Castile.
Under the patronage of the Earl of Warwick, William Bagot was a member of Parliament for many years. An intimate associate of Richard II he was, with Sir John Bussy and Sir Henry Green, one of Richard's three continual councilors. When Richard left for Ireland at the end of May 1399 Bagot, Bussy, Green, and the Treasurer William le Scrope were left in charge of the Kingdom. In July Henry Bollingbroke (later Henry IV) landed at Ravenspur on the Humber Estuary. Bagot and the others moved to Bristol Castle which was thought to be impregnable. However, Henry amassed a large army of some 60,000 men and besieged Bristol Castle which soon fell. William Bagot managed to escape, and joined Richard in Ireland. Bussy, Green, and Scrope were captured and executed by Henry.
When Richard returned to England and surrendered to Henry in the August, William was arrested, confined to the Tower of London, and his lands confiscated. However, being popular with the Commons, the Parliament of 1400 petitioned for his release and restoration of his lands, which Henry IV agreed to along with a pension of ?100 a year. William died in 1407, his brother John fought alongside Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

Brass monument to William Bagot
Brass to William Bagot (1407). The figures are 4ft 9.5 inches high.
St. John the Baptist, Baginton, Warwickshire

(Link)
Sir William Bagot (died 1407) was a politician and administrator under Richard II

(Link)
Sir William Bagot
1407
Church of St John the Baptist, Baginton, Warwickshire, England

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P0280b
 
Personal Data
Surname Hethe (?)
First name Unknown
Nickname  
Dating 1400?
Location Mildenhall
Life dates  
Title  
Close relatives  
Type of the object brass
Place of manufacturing
(place of burial)
 
Place of exposition formerly in Mildenhall and now lost
St Mary's Church, Mildenhall, Suffolk, England
Date of manufacturing  
Artist
Comments

(Link)
A brass of an unknown man-at-arms, formerly in Mildenhall and now lost - after Stothard. c.1400

(Link)
Mildenhall Knight
1400
St Mary's Church, Mildenhall, Suffolk, England

(Link)
Catalogue of Manuscripts in the Library of All Souls College
Drawing ... by Rev. Thomas Kerrich

(Link)
Library of All Souls College

(Link)
the lost Mildenhall brass may have commemorated a member of the Hethe family of Little Saxham, Suffolk. A significant feature of the brass was that the figure sported a collar with an ermine collared and under a crown, a device of either Henry IV or his second wife, Joan of Navarre. Peter Heseltine suggested the brass was to Thomas Hethe, d. 1414, who served John of Gaunt, Henry IV’s father, and asked in his will to be buried in the porch of Mildenhall church. However, as argued below, the C series probably ceased c. 1407. If this brass were to Thomas, it would thus have had to have been commissioned in his own lifetime, but a brass this prestigious is highly unlikely to have been placed other than in the main body of the church. There are other members of the family who are possible candidates. Nigel Saul has suggested that the collar perhaps points to the commemorated being Thomas’s father, Sir John Hethe, d. 1392, who was a Lancastrian retainer, or Thomas’s elder brother Robert, d. 1396, though his Lancastrian links were looser. Unfortunately the stylistic evidence is incapable of providing a precise dating within such a brief time-span, hence a definite attribution cannot be given.

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