A0341
 
A0341
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Personal Data
Title Saint George
Dating 1420?
Location North Tuddenham
Type of the object stained glass
Provenance Barry found the medieval glass in a builder's yard in nearby Dereham in the early 1880s
Tradition recalls two churches from which the glass may have come: Lyng and Billingford by North Elmham
Billingford, near North Elmham, or perhaps Elsing
now-ruined church of Wiggenhall St Peter in West Norfolk, just south of King's Lynn
Place of exposition parish church of St Mary, North Tuddenham, Norfolk, UK
Date of manufacturing c.1420–30
Artist  
Comments

https://vidimus.org/issues/issue-92/books/
North Tuddenham (Norfolk), parish church of St Mary: St George and the Dragon.
British CVMA author David King has drawn attention to an image of St George in North Tuddenham (Norfolk) and its association with John Wakeryng, bishop of Norwich 1416–1425, a loyal ally of Henry V and Keeper of the Privy Seal 1415–1416, who was buried beside the altar of St George in Norwich Cathedral after his death in 1425

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North Tuddenham
St Mary
County (in 1974) Norfolk
NGR
TG 056 129
Building Type (current)
Parish church
Building Type (to 1530)
Parish church
CVMA Window Number
wI
Window Description
West window
CVMA Panel Number
1c
Panel Description
Main-light panel
Published Source
Haward 1984, (See gazetteer, no page number)
Part
Main-light panel
Century (from)
Early 15th c
Century (to)
Mid 15th c

(Link)
The story goes that Barry found the medieval glass in a builder's yard in nearby Dereham in the early 1880s

(Link)
The story goes that Barry found the medieval glass in a builder's yard in nearby Dereham in the early 1880s. There are ideas about where it came from; half a century later, surviving members of the Armstrong family recalled Barry mentioning Billingford, near North Elmham, or perhaps Elsing. Neither is likely, and perhaps we will never know.

(Link)
North Tuddenham, church of St Mary: St George greets the king's daughter and fights the dragon, c.1420–30
The panel, together with another panel and and a number of fragments from the series, is now to be seen in the west window of the parish church of St Mary in North Tuddenham, although the glass was not originally made for that church.
Christopher Woodforde rightly chose the North Tuddenham glass as one of the five major collections to be allocated a separate chapter in his book The Norwich School of Glass-Painting in the Fifteenth Century. He informs us that the glass was bought by the Revd Robert Barry, rector 1851–1904, in East Dereham, where it was lying in a builder's yard. Barry is said to have paid half a guinea for it. Most of the glass was installed in the church windows, and the remaining panels being stored in the rectory. Later, some of it was used to glaze the porch, and after that what was left went to Welbourne Church.
The glass at Tuddenham may have more than one provenance, as it falls into two main groups from the point of view of style and date: one group consists of a number of main- and tracery-light panels of c.1420–30; the other is a collection of miscellaneous tracery-light panels, rather later in date and in different styles. Tradition recalls two churches from which the glass may have come: Lyng and Billingford by North Elmham. Neither church, however, has windows of a suitable shape or size to have accommodated the glass of the first group, which is the subject here.
I would like to suggest that the first group, including the St Margaret panel, was originally made for the now-ruined church of Wiggenhall St Peter in West Norfolk, just south of King's Lynn [Fig. 2]. As so often, the evidence is circumstantial and of varying character, but it certainly more persuasive, I think, than that hitherto adduced for other churches. The most important panels in this group consist of parts of two hagiographical series of the lives of St Margaret of Antioch and St George of Cappadocia. The first series is more complete, with two main-light panels and a number of fragments leaded into tracery lights. All that survives of the second are one main-light panel and some fragments, one in a tracery light, the others in a porch window [Fig. 3]. These panels are characterised by a courtly atmosphere, with elegant postures and aristocratic costume; they have been compared with the celebrated frontispiece to Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde in one of the most beautiful and lavishly decorated prefatory miniatures of the early fifteenth century, c.1415–20 (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge MS 61; Fig. 4)

так как настоящее место происхождения витража неясно, а все предполагаемые источники находятся неподалеку вокруг North Tuddenham, то будет сохранено это местонахождения

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