A0296
 
A0296
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Personal Data
Title Sant George
Dating 1420?
Location Unknown (Flanders?)
Type of the object wood carving
Provenance England (possibly, made) Flanders (probably, made)
Place of exposition Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England
Date of manufacturing 1420-1440
Artist Unknown
Comments

Oak panel, front of a chest, carved with a representation of the story of St. George and the Dragon. V. & A. M.

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O118577/panel-unknown/
Panel
Place of origin: England (possibly, made) Flanders (probably, made)
Date: 1420-1440 (made)
Artist/Maker: Unknown
Materials and Techniques: Carved oak
Museum number: 82-1893
Gallery location: In Storage
This panel depicts the story of St George and the Dragon, a popular theme in Christian Art. In the Left hand at the top is St George offering his services to Sabra, whilst beneath he is wounding the dragon. The princess accompanied by the Saint is leading the wounded dragon into the city of Memphis where the King and Queen are watching the scene from their castle windows. Rabbits are seen issuing from and disappearing into holes in the rugged ground, which is diversified by trees. A lion sits near the walls of the city, which is entered by a bridge over a stream. Like medieval tapestries, the depiction of the story portrays different episodes of the story running into one another, allowing complicated action to be shown without consequent fragmentation of the design.
When acquired it was thought to be English 14th century work and to have come from Rufford Abbey, Nottinghamshire, but it was subsequently condemned by Museum authorities as a fake. Various 20th centuries experts regard it as early 15th century, but Flemish, the carving of very high quality, and relate it to a chest with similar front panel at York Minster, dated c.1380.
Carved in high relief with a representation of St George and the Dragon. In the Left hand at the top is St George offering his services to Sabra, whilst beneath he is wounding the dragon.The princess accompanied by the Saint is leading the wounded dragon into the city of Memphis where the King and Queen are watching the scene from their castle windows. Rabbits are seen issuing from and disappearing into holes in the rugged ground, which is diversified by trees. A lion sits near the walls of the city, which is entered by a bridge over a stream. The grassy ground is indicated by a series of double vertical lines.
The panel consists of 3 oak planks (apparently slow growth oak, which are laterally grained) very tightly glued. A number of patch repairs in a different coloured oak are evident, notably at centre top where a lock plate would normally have been positioned. The carving is noticeably deep by comparison with most chest fronts of the period. The vertical side edges of the panel have been planed relatively smooth, removing any evidence of joints between this panel and adjacent members.

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